Thursday, August 15, 2013

U.S. Pleas Fail to Stave Off Crackdown

Amazingly so.

At WSJ, "Hundreds Dead in Egypt: Security Forces' Efforts to Clear Cairo Sit-Ins Sparks Violence; At Least 421 People Killed Across Egyptt":
CAIRO—Egypt's military regime, aided by snipers and bulldozers, swept the streets of Islamist protesters Wednesday—setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead, the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters.

Cairo's streets were calm Thursday morning following a curfew overnight, with funerals for the dead and further protests expected later in the day.

Muslim Brotherhood sympathizers stormed police stations Wednesday, burned down churches and battled with government supporters in several neighborhoods, after police sweeps left scores of protesters dead at two Cairo squares. The raid ended more than a month of sit-ins by thousands of Brotherhood supporters—sometimes joined by families, and daring the government to disperse them—who demanded the reinstatement of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

Egypt's interim president declared a monthlong, national state of emergency—raising Egyptians' fears of extended conflict, further crackdowns and the prospect that the military regime they struggled to overthrow in 2011 was reasserting control.

The country's interim vice president, Mohamed ElBaradei, resigned. His exit stripped away an important veneer of civilian participation in the regime set up by the military's chief, Gen. Abdel Fattah Al Sisi, who responded to popular protests against Mr. Morsi by removing him and installing the interim government.

Swift and severe condemnation of the deadly attacks and state of emergency rolled in from Turkey, Europe and the United Nations. The U.S., one of Egypt's chief allies and benefactors, called the events deplorable and threatened to call off joint military exercises that were set to start next month.
More here.

Plus, "U.S. Can't Prevent Massive Loss of Live."

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