Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Michele Bachmann on John Quincy Adams

Nothing Michele Bachmann said was factually wrong. The controversy hinges on whether John Quincy Adams was part of the Founding generation. He was. President George Washington appointed John Quincy Adams Minister to the Netherlands in 1794. The Bill of Rights to the Constitution was ratified in 1791 during the same presidential administration. And John Quincy Adams traveled to Paris with his father John Adams, when the latter served as America's Ambassador to France from 1778 until 1779. Hence, Congresswoman Bachmann's statements aren't all that off the mark. John Quincy Adams was not a signer of the Declaration of Independence or Constitution, but certainly was serving importantly as a member of the era, as Bachmann states after George Stephanopoulos tries to elicit a misstatement:
John Quincy Adams most certainly was a part of the Revolutionary War era. He was a young boy but he was actively involved.

I try to like Stephanopoulos, despite the fact that he was a top adviser to President Bill Clinton. See, "John Quincy Adams a Founding Father? Michele Bachmann Says Yes" (via Memeorandum). Was John Quincy Adams a Founder as in a signer of our founding documents? No? Was he a member of the Founding generation who would have a substantial impact on the course of American history? Absolutely. Yes.

Wouldn't it be nice if folks like Stephanopoulos went after Democrats just an aggressively?

ADDED: I've got some progressive idiots visiting from Instaputz's stinkhole, and one of these idiots writes:
That 57 states gaffe said THREE YEARS AGO is still giving you wingers serious mileage isn't it?

The number of gaffes Obama has made compared to the number of gaffes Bush made... anyone? ...
Well, folks can check out how many gaffes Bush made, but he never made one like this:

I wrote on this last week, but Michael Barone points out today the wicked media double standards when it comes to political misstatements, "Mainstream media covers up horrifying Obama mistake" (at Memeorandum):

It’s interesting that mainstream media journalists who are so eager to zing Michele Bachmann for getting John Wayne’s birthplace wrong, have not been interested in asking whether this was a mistake Obama made in ad libbing or whether the White House speechwriters and fact-checkers fell down on the job. You might think that their chief motive is to make Obama look good and to suppress facts that make him look bad.
Well, yeah, you might think. Idiots.

9 comments:

davemartin7777 said...

That 57 states gaffe said THREE YEARS AGO is still giving you wingers serious mileage isn't it?

The number of gaffes Obama has made compared to the number of gaffes Bush made... anyone?

I've notice that the "teleprompter" meme is not as popular anymore as Obama has given dozens of non-scripted interviews like the one with Bill O'Reilly during the Superbowl.

Defective Pants said...

Your argument that she said nothing wrong is simply not true, and no amount of revisionist history will change that. Bachman's original comment was:

"But we also know that the very founders that wrote those documents worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States," Bachmann added, claiming "men like John Quincy Adams... would not rest until slavery was extinguished in the country."

That is completely untrue. The founding fathers, of which there is no credible argument that JQA was one, who "wrote those documents" did not "work tirelessly" to eradicate slavery.

Don't let Bachmann drag you down. She is wrong. Get over it and stop jumping to defend the indefensible.

Donald Douglas said...

'The founding fathers, of which there is no credible argument that JQA was one ...'

She didn't say he was a Founding Father ...

When pressed she clarified that he was of the Revolutionary era. You guys misogynist much?

Defective Pants said...

What part of my comment is misogynistic, or even references gender? That is another knee-jerk defense that is based in fantasy-land. Just because she is a woman doesn't mean she can't be wrong, and shouldn't be criticized when she is. Or maybe "misogyny" doesn't mean what you think it means?

Read he quote, Donald. I'm not making things up. She did not clarify. She doubled-down, and then her supporters went running to Wikipedia to attempt to rewrite history - which would be completely unnecessary if she clarified like you claim. That is not healthy behavior.

Donald Douglas said...

'I'm not making things up. She did not clarify.'

Yes, she did. My reference is to her comments to Stephanopoulos. J.Q. Adams was a member of the Founding generation. And you're saying he's not? You make claims while pounding the table demanding to be right. Progressives are losers and the attacks on Bachmann are misogynistic.

Defective Pants said...

For someone who claims to be an associate professor, I find your complete misunderstanding or willful ignorance of the term "misogyny" very troubling. You have made it quite clear from your comments that you have no interest in a dialogue beyond branding anyone who criticizes Bachmann a misogynist and engaging in blind defense of her statements by some perceived progressive threat. For the love of whatever it is you find sacred, come back to reality.

But I'll give you shot. Without looking it up (honor system), what is misogyny, and how do any of my comments display said misogyny? It's okay. We all know you can't answer the question.

From the exact same interview with GS - here is the quote:

Bachmann: Well if you look at one of our Founding Fathers, John Quincy Adams, that’s absolutely true. He was a very young boy when he was with his father serving essentially as his father’s secretary. He tirelessly worked throughout his life to make sure that we did in fact one day eradicate slavery…

Please, Donald, after explaining how my quoting Bachmann is misogynistic, tell us how she didn't claim that JGQ was a founding father?

Defective Pants said...

And before you go off track again, here is the follow-up:

Stephanopoulos: He wasn’t one of the Founding Fathers – he was a president, he was a Secretary of State, he was a member of Congress, you’re right he did work to end slavery decades later. But so you are standing by this comment that the Founding Fathers worked tirelessly to end slavery?

Bachmann: Well, John Quincy Adams most certainly was a part of the Revolutionary War era. He was a young boy but he was actively involved.

So asked point blank again whether the FOUNDING FATHERS worked tirelessly to end slavery, she again directly cites JQA.

Donald Douglas said...

She clarified, and you just cited it:

'Well, John Quincy Adams most certainly was a part of the Revolutionary War era. He was a young boy but he was actively involved.'

What is incorrect about that? My post is entirely correct. You're flailing here, son.

And you dispute I'm an associate professor? Why? You're really worked up over this. And again, progressives hate conservative women. They attack them mercilessly for simply deviating from the narrative. Progressives are genuinely bad people. Are you progressive?

Ronald Grey said...

Dear Sir or Madam:

It appears that we, indeed, don't know much about history.

Why is everybody - on both sides of this debate - missing the most famous example of the Founding Fathers' work to end slavery?

See 'Michele Bachmann: Est-elle faible? (Is she weak?)': http://t.co/74CIZZa

Sincerely,
Ronald Grey
http://ronaldgrey.com