Tuesday, July 29, 2014

ESPN's Stephen A. Smith Apologizes for 'Provocation' Comments (VIDEO)

Truth Revolt reports:
Friday Stephen A. Smith made the grave mistake of attempting to discuss domestic violence as a male on live television, cautioning against coming to conclusions about Ray Rice’s apparent abuse of his then-fianc√©, now-wife without full knowledge of the event.

“In Ray Rice’s case, he probably deserves more than a two-game suspension, which we both acknowledged,” said Smith. “But at the same time, we also have to make sure that we learn as much as we can about elements of provocation. Not that there’s real provocation, but the elements of provocation...”
And at the Other McCain, "An Ill-Advised Apology":


This is another sad example of the harmful impact of feminism’s totalitarian impulse to suppress dissent. Anyone who has seriously studied domestic violence knows that, in many cases, bad relationships are characterized by toxic emotions on both sides. You’ve got two people with uncontrollable tempers — often drugs or alcohol are involved, and often one or both partners were raised in households where abuse and violence were a problem — and when they get into an argument, the argument turns into a physical fight.

Doesn’t anybody watch C*O*P*S? The police show up in response to a domestic disturbance call, and they encounter the scruffy tattooed brute and his foul-mouthed tattooed live-in girlfriend.
Both of them are bad drunk, and the police have to question them separately to try to figure out what actually  happened: How did it start? Who hit who? Each partner points the finger of blame at the other, and the police have to sort out the evidence and testimony. Has one or the other partner got a bruise or a busted lip? Does one of them admit doing something that can be considered assault?

Most of the time, it’s the guy who gets handcuffed and put in the back of the patrol car, but as you watch these  C*O*P*S episodes — unedited, unstaged — quite often your sympathy for the female victim is tempered by the fact that (a) she had, after all, chosen to move in with this wretched boyfriend, and (b) she’s not exactly a meek and helpless type. She’s drunk, she’s got a Marlboro hanging out of her mouth, and she’s cussing like a sailor. Lowlife women have a habit of gravitating toward lowlife men, and the fact that their relationships are fraught with ugly violence is an unfortunate but predictable reality. It is what it is.
Here's the "offending" segment: "Stephen A. Smith to Women: ‘Don’t Do Anything to Provoke’ Men Into Beating You."

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